Thursday, October 20, 2005

My Name is George



NBC's new comedy My Name is Earl operates on the premise that

Earl [...]has taken one too many wrong turns on the highway of life. However, a twist of fate turns his life into a tailspin of life-renewing events. Earl wins a small lottery, and, after an epiphany, he is determined to transform his good fortune into a life-changing event as he sets out to right all the wrongs from his past.
Before Earl can begin his journey, his inevitable attraction to misfortune surfaces once again. Seconds after winning the lottery, he is hit by a car and while unconscious; the winning lottery ticket blows away. While in the hospital, Earl watches "Last Call with Carson Daly" where Carson says that his success is a direct result of doing good things for other people. It is at that moment Earl discovers karma- and in hope of a better life, he sets out to correct every bad thing he's ever done.

Earl has a very long list of misdeeds -- 250 or so --and one by one, he's trying to make amends to each of the people he's hurt. As he feels his way through his new life philosophy, he and his dim-bulb brother learn firsthand that good deeds bring rewards; bad deeds just bring more misery.

Earl's mantra: Do good things and good things happen to ya; do bad things an' they'll come back to haunt ya. I'm talkin' about karma.

Some prominent Republicans just might want to take note.

2 comments:

Waveflux said...

I've caught just half of one episode - something about lottery winnings in a car that got impounded and Earl trying to get to the cash before his ex-wife and some kind of high school football game as a subplot - and I laughed. It was kind of a sweet, good-natured show. Who knew?

Bitty said...

I think I've seen them all. The first fifteen minutes...essentially the backstory...had me in stiches. Since then, I've found it "merely" funny.

As I've watched it, I seriously have wondered if the creators aren't speaking to us all...or at least those in power. Hence, the post.

I'm sure I'm reading too much into it. Or not.